Among nonexistent temples one of the first places is taken by the “New Synagogue” that was the biggest in Germany and Austria at the time of its completion next to the New Synagogue in Berlin. Located at the junction of Podwale Street and Łąkowa Street it was the centre of Jewish liberalism in Wroclaw until the time of its destruction. The residents of Wrocław named it the “Synagogue on Wygon”.  The construction of the synagogue started in 1865 with the cornerstone’s celebration. The plans of the synagogue were made by a German architect of Jewish origin Edwin Oppler. The brick construction of the synagogue was made in a modified rectangular plan in Neo-Gothic and Neo-Roman styles.

The synagogue was one of the most famous buildings in Wrocław and was known because of the 73 meter high dome, numerous towers and pinnacles. Inside there was located a huge main prayer room that was surrounded by three galleries for women supported by decorated columns. On the eastern wall there was located very richly ornamented Aron ha-kodesz in front of which there was a contor’s desktop and a bima. During the Cristal Night 9/10 November 1938 Hitler’s militias burned the synagogue. After the Second World War it wasn’t rebuilt. The monument with an inscription in three languages: Polish, German and Hebrew commemorating the temple was unveiled in 1998. It is written: “They have set Thy sanctuary on fire; they have profaned to the ground the dwelling to Thy name” (PS 74,7).

A very characteristic and beautiful temple that was destroyed with its whole neighborhood was St. Paul’s Church. It was built in 1911-1913. It was located next to Legnicka Street, close to Strzegomski Square and the bunker. The temple was known because it had two towers and one chancel. After 1915 it was changed into a protestant church. During the Second World War it was changed into a watchtower and destroyed during the siege.

Source: tuwroclaw.com

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